Good books about C#.NET & WPF

Jun 8, 2009 at 3:20 PM

Hi all,

I'm requesting your help about books. I want to learn C#.NET & WPF to do Windows Application but I don't know good books for beginner.

Have you some suggestions ? If possible, can the books be in French ?

 

Best regards

Jun 8, 2009 at 6:35 PM

Personally, I'd start c# with this book:  "Inside c#", Tom Archer, Microsoft Press.

Free online is:  http://www.charlespetzold.com/dotnet/

.NET Book Zero
What the C or C++ Programmer Needs to
Know About C# and the .NET Framework, Charles Petzold

 

Gerry

Jun 9, 2009 at 12:53 AM

You are welcome.  This is the WPF book that I would likely recommend:

Pro WPF in C# 2008: Windows Presentation Foundation with .NET 3.5, Second Edition
http://www.apress.com/book/view/9781590599556

I say likely because I have not yet read enough of it to be sure.

Chapter 1 is a free download of Pro_WPF_in_C_2008_Windows_Presentation_Foundation_with_NET_3_5_Second_Edition-3928.pdf.

Chapter 1 is 20 pages and will give an idea of how Matthew MacDonald writes.  http://www.apress.com/book/downloadfile/3928

The book is over 1000 pages.  Both weight and content are heavy.

 

Gerry

 

Jun 9, 2009 at 7:00 AM

Hi Gerry,


Thank you for your help. I will check those books and, why not, begin to learn C# and WPF with them. :)

 

Tuttu

Jun 9, 2009 at 7:29 AM

I have found just a problem with the first (e-)book that you suggests... I'm a beginner in C family programming, I have juste used C language during 2 years of my studies...

Will the book be difficult to read for me ?

 

Tuttu

Jun 9, 2009 at 10:18 AM

Programming books are difficult to read if you do not have a good foundation.

e-books are free, and sometimes worth reading.

petzold is famous.

the secret of reading a technical book is to read it over and over and over until you understand.

i would learn c# first rather than attempting the c# with wpf book

with any programming book, do the exercises more than once ... try to be able to do them without looking at the book; be sure that you understand an exercise before moving on.

even if something is not called an exercise, treat it as one.  if the author shows you code that adds 2 + 2 and prints the result, type that code, compile it, run it, ensure it really works.

if you have friends or teachers who can help, use their help.

if there are user groups where you live, join them.

if you can afford it, join ACM ... for about US$100 per year ($50 if you are unemployed) you get access to hundreds of courses and books.

 

gerry

Jun 9, 2009 at 12:08 PM

Thank you for those helpful information gerry.

I will try to follow them the better I can. :)